There are no two ways about it: Muncie Community Schools are in trouble. I won’t go into my personal opinions, but the bottom line is that teachers and students are going to suffer through no fault of their own.
People are trying to get to the bottom of the financial situation, and people are working to move forward in some fashion, figuring out ways to keep the system afloat and working through the next school year. As a martial art school owner, I don’t have much to offer any of those people, but I may have something for the teachers and students who are affected the most in this crisis.
I’ve been reading news stories and editorials for several days, and I imagine that teacher morale is very low. I want to show my support for teachers especially, but for the students too. I hope this article finds its way to teachers, parents, and administrators who can introduce me to the right people to develop a program.

Most people know that traditional martial art instruction has a lot to do with self-discipline, focus, and respect for elders/authority. Those values are built-in to Asian culture. They used to be, at least. From what I understand, as Asia becomes more “Western,” they are losing some of those traditions.
At any rate, they are still critical in traditional martial art schools like ours. Students learn to focus on tasks and to set and achieve goals. They learn to practice by themselves. And, like anything, some people learn these lessons quicker than others.
Learning martial art in a traditional school like mine is a gift that many students never get the chance to experience. I am committed to exploring ways to bring that gift to the local education system. I want to donate my time and my equipment so that teachers, students, and even administrators can benefit from the lessons that I have learned and regularly teach to my students. I want to donate my time to work with teachers and students. I will arrange workshops and introduce these values to students. My thought is that by teaching a short martial art lesson or two, I can share some of the methods that we use to affect positive change in the lives of our students.

If you are someone who can help me with this idea, feel free to email me or get in touch via the comment section.

Published by Ken Ring

Born and raised in and around Muncie, Indiana, Kyo Sa Nim Ken got married after college, then moved away to learn how to fly airplanes. He came back to Muncie several years later as a Black Belt in Kuk Sool Won, opened his school and proceeded to teach the traditional martial art of Korea to the good people of Muncie.

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